From the Library: Tyrell

[easyazon_link identifier=”0439838800″ locale=”US” tag=”youblawornet-20″]Tyrell[/easyazon_link], a book for teenagers by Coe Booth, aims to paint a descriptive picture of the life of a heavily-burdened African-American teenager. Booth does this by narrating the life of fifteen-year-old Tyrell, whose life has been affected by homelessness, crime, drugs, infedility, and moral dilemmas. [easyazon_image align=”center” height=”160″ identifier=”0439838800″ locale=”US” src=”http://yourblackeducation.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/514q2BuFCNGL.SL160.jpg” tag=”youblawornet-20″ width=”109″] The protagonist,…...

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What is Culturally Responsive Teaching, Anyway?

[fvplayer src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/ybevideos/Shonta+Smith+on+2015-09-21+at+10.07+For+Internet.mov”] The declining numbers of Black teachers has had a damaging effect on the education of Black children. Matters have been worsened by non-black teachers who lack understanding of our culture and our children. Dr. Shonta Smith, Professor at Southeast Missouri State University, defines culturally responsive teaching and how it contributes to, or interferes…...

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Activists are Bringing Education Back to Girls in Nigeria, Despite Boko Haram

By Evette D. Champion Out of the estimated 57 million children that are not in school around the world, 10 million of these children reside in Nigeria. What’s even more disheartening is that the majority of these children are female. In the predominantly Muslim northern portion of the African country, the situation is bleak. Girls…

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Not All College Students Are Succeeding

This article originally found at The Washington Post Being the first person in the family to go to college should be an exciting time. I was the first in my family, and my husband the first in his family. And yes, we both did graduate. It should be easy though, right? Get a scholarship, get…

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How Bad Do You Want It? Part I

I have heard a lot of motivational and empowering speeches and talks in my lifetime. I have actually delivered many motivational and empowering talks myself. It seems that the core message in every one of these speeches, talks, sermons or keynote addresses as been: “How bad do you want it?” So, I want to ask this…

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Black Arts Student Is One of the Top Five Youth Poets in the U.S.

By Evette D. Champion Sixteen-year- old De’John Hardges is a junior at Cleveland School of the Arts. He lives in Garfield Heights and is an ambassador for the literary arts. His real talent can be seen in his poetry. He enjoys reading his own poetry and he even has a collection of his poems on his…

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Jahvaris Fulton: Using Tragedy as a Catalyst for Change

There are those who crumble under the hurt and pain of life and then there are those who use it as a form of motivation. Jahvaris Fulton uses his life experiences to motivate. While you may not know the name Jahvaris Fulton, you do know his younger brother Trayvon Martin. Ever since the death of…

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How to Help Kids Evaluate Websites as Credible Sources

Information is, literally, at the tips of our fingers when it comes to school. But do students know how to vet the sites they are using when conducting research via the Internet? According to Edutopia, “A survey found that only 4 percent of middle school students reported checking the accuracy of information found on the…

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Obama Says That Education Goes Beyond Tests, Announces End of Bush’s ‘No Child Left Behind’ Policy

By Victor Ochieng Assessing how well students learn is quite important. But when education solely focuses on tests, then it totally loses its meaning. When George W. Bush came up with educational reforms under “No Child Left Behind” program, it seemed like a brilliant idea. Unfortunately, it has impeded access to quality education. It has turned…

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