Will the Obama Administration Start Focusing on Desegregating Schools?

By Evette D. Champion Once Arne Duncan ends his term as Secretary of Education in December, John King will take over. While we don’t expect much to change when it comes to federal education policy, there may be one positive change in the future. King might take the necessary steps to focus the department’s energy and…

Read More →

October 1: Start Date for FAFSA Filing for 2017-2018

While I know the 2016-2017 school year just got started, there is no such thing as starting to plan too early for the 2017-2018 school year. October 1, 2016: mark it on your calendar now. Why? Because it is the official launch date for students to start filing their FAFSA forms for the 2017-2018 school…

Read More →

Five Black Historical Facts that Your Child will Never Learn in School (Part 1)

Most of our schools give history from their own perspective, and not ours. This leads to warped perspectives for young black children, low self-esteem, and a peculiar form of intellectual inadequacy. It’s up to us to fill in that void to ensure that our children learn everything they need to know. In this video, History…

Read More →

How Much is too Much in Kindergarten?

This article originally found at NPR Nowadays, kindergarteners are learning things that are increasingly more complex. When I was a child, kindergarten consisted of sitting on a mat playing games like duck-duck-goose and who stole the cookie from the cookie jar, naps, and play-doh. It was also about preparing for going to a higher grade. Of…

Read More →

Hunger Runs Rampant on College Campuses

This article originally found at The Atlantic The “Freshman 15.” We all know what that is, those 15 pesky pounds that many students gain when entering college due to a change from positive eating habits, sleep habits, workout habits, mom-feeding-you habits, to detrimental ones including late night snacking, pizza for breakfast, and dining halls with…

Read More →

The Social Value of Group Work

Using group work at particular intervals of the learning process provides students the opportunity to explore their roles, define their capacities, and develop their skills as a collective. While teachers also see the functioning of the group and evaluate the students according to the group’s role, it is easy to overlook the social benefit of…

Read More →

Kindergarteners are Being Suspended for Calling Out Answers During Class

By Evette D. Champion Annually, approximately 3 million students, most of whom are in high school, receive out-of-school suspensions. However, more and more children in preschool or kindergarten are being sent home as punishment for infractions that would make you raise your eyebrows. In a PBS NewsHour Special, John Merrow discusses suspensions within the Success Charter…

Read More →

Are We Steering Young People Towards College Without a Navigation System?

By Felicia Williams In 2011, the Common Core Standards were introduced and implemented by school districts across the United States. To date, there are 43 states that have voluntarily adopted and are working to implement the standards. One of the reasons that these Standards were designed was to ensure that students graduating from high school…

Read More →

You Don’t Have to be a Writing Expert to Help Your Child Write Well

By Tyra Seldon From my vantage point, most people either love writing or hate it—very rarely do I meet people who are ambivalent or indifferent about the topic. I can even remember some of my former students, who were optical engineering majors, asking me, “How is this relevant for my profession?” Compounding this even further…

Read More →

Back to Top